Collection of Linux related news hopefully!

The promise of software-defined networks (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV) to alleviate complexity and improve agility is achievable and has already been deployed in many cases, but there are still challenges to overcome for SDN and NFV to become ubiquitous. So how do we get there? Ask Christos Kolias, senior research scientist at Orange Silicon Valley. 

Carla Schroder is a self-taught Linux and Windows sysadmin and the author of the Linux Cookbook and writer of thousands of Linux tutorials.

If there is only one message you take away from reading this, let it be this: Linux and FOSS do not need more glamorous elite uber-rockstar coders. We need more ordinary, dedicated individuals from all walks of life contributing however they can. Just plain ordinary people with whatever they have to offer.

I am a born nerd, born to take things apart and put them back together, and to combine unlike things in imaginative ways. I am one of those people you never want to go shopping with, because I have to stand in front of any item I might ever under any circumstances consider purchasing, and work through in my head the nine zillion ways in which I might use it ... and then move on to the next item and repeat the trance. Because why not? Is it not all about possibilities?

7,500 staffers at Big Blue 'expected' to transfer over

IBM has offloaded its failing x86 biz to Lenovo for $2.3bn, albeit a day later than our sources had predicted.

 A few key features stand out as particularly notable in this new Linux release. Here's a quick run-down.

Lightweight Linux-lovin approach blows the doors off of typical virtualization

Containerization expert Docker has slurped $15m in filthy valley lucre to help it push its tech further into data centers under the leadership of a new, experienced chief executive.

Rikki Endsley is a technology journalist and the USENIX Association’s community manager. In the past, she worked as the associate publisher of Linux Pro Magazine, ADMIN, and Ubuntu User, and as the managing editor of Sys Admin magazine. Find her online at rikkiendsley.com and @rikkiends on Twitter.

I've been a writer for as long as I can remember, which is why I was thrilled to receive an electric typewriter as a high school graduation gift in 1988. Asking for a computer was never something I considered. I don't remember ever being exposed to computers while I was growing up. After high school, I didn't even use my new electric typewriter for a while. Instead, I took a year off, continued working my record store job, and saw dozens of great bands.

My nerd story starts at a record store, with a cash register and a Schwann catalog.

Exclusive Moles blame Bezos for paltry code sharing

Amazon is one of the most technically influential companies operating today – but you wouldn't know it, thanks to a dearth of published research papers and negligible code contributions to the open-source projects it relies on.

Google-grown Asha replacement looks ON

Images of a Nokia phone running a forked branch of Android have been circulating since November - when the project was still very much alive - with many more tumbling out of leak sites last week.

Willem ter Harmsel chats with Ricardo Badalone about SAN bottlenecks

With IBM adopting Diablo Technologies' Memory Channel Storage (MCS) for its gen 6 X-servers, we thought it timely to have a look at the background to this through a Willem ter Harmsel interview with Ricardo Badalone, Diablo Technologies' CEO.

Today we released our 2014 global event schedule. Back in 2007, we created The Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit because I could see a unique opportunity to bring together the developers, industry leaders and end users (largely from the enterprise) who were creating this thing we called Linux. We knew that face-to-face collaboration amongst disparate yet aligned groups could reap great rewards. Soon we were adding developers and companies from the world of mobile, then embedded computing, then cloud computing, then automotive to events first in North America, then Asia, then Europe. Basically everywhere Linux has gone, we have gone.