Collection of Linux related news hopefully!

DeviceGuru writes As seen in this year-end summary of 40 hacker-friendly SBCs, 2014 brought us plenty of new Linux and Android friendly single-board computers to tinker with — ranging from $35 bargains, to octa-core powerhouses. Many of the new arrivals feature 1-2GHz multicore SoCs, 1-2GB RAM, generous built-in flash, gigabit Ethernet, WiFi, on-board FPGAs, and other extras. However, most of the growth has been in the sub-$50 segment, where the Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone reign supreme, but are now being challenged by a growing number of feature-enhanced clones, such as the Banana Pi and Orange Pi. Best of all, there's every reason to expect 2015 to accelerate these trends.

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When you're sat at the tail end of the year, a fresh and important new year for the Ubuntu project right around the corner, the impetus to look back at what's done can seem pointless. We lived through it. Let's move on.

The post 12 Months, 12 Highlights: This was Ubuntu in 2014 first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

+Comment Case highlights strange behaviour from Google-friendly VC-backed firm

An obscure court case in India appears to have dented hopes of the mobile industry weaning itself off Google dependency - and has raised questions about the goals of Cyanogen and its backer, a Silicon Valley VC firm with close ties to Google.

Put it on a stick and 'cheesie'

Facebook buying WhatsApp for nearly as much as Hewlett-Packard spent on Compaq in 2001? Well, 2014 was the year of the selfie, after all. Just don't let that snapshot of your bits get hacked.

Shame and coming late can be good things ... right?

Ho hum. Another year, another slew of open source announcements that prove the once-maligned development methodology is now so mainstream as to be tedious. Running most of the world’s most powerful supercomputers? Been there, done that. Giving retailers the ability to deliver highly customized paper coupons to consumers based on warehouse inventory nearby? So 2013!

Cryptographically signed BIND, DHCP code safe, we're told

The website for the Internet Systems Consortium, which develops the BIND DNS and ISC DHCP tools, has been hacked.

Crypto toolbox, Part II Of Tor, TAILS and Jabber

In the first article in this two-parter on building your own crypto toolbox I covered older tools that have been around for a relatively long time now: Truecrypt and OpenPGP. Here, I will go in a different direction and look at ways of protecting instant messaging, general web-browsing, and how to trust the operating system where we run these tools.

An anonymous reader writes Linux 3.18 was recently released, thus making Linux 3.19 the version under development as the year comes to a close. Linux 3.19 as the first big kernel update of 2015 is bringing in the new year with many new features: among them are AMDKFD HSA kernel driver, Intel "Skylake" graphics support, Radeon and NVIDIA driver improvements, RAID5/6 improvements for Btrfs, LZ4 compression for SquashFS, better multi-touch support, new input drivers, x86 laptop improvements, etc.

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There was great news and there was awful news in the world of Linux and open-source software during 2014.
343 people on the mailing list, €3,473 in cash and systemd replacement under way

Devuan, the Debian spin-off that will not include systemd has posted its first progress report.