Collection of Linux related news hopefully!

The Linux Foundation is offering a new self-paced class to help you get ready for the Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator exam.

Reading LibreOffice documents on the go gets a heap easier from today with the beta release of LibreOffice Viewer for Android.

The post LibreOffice Viewer for Android Beta Makes On the Go Reading a Cinch first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Though he eventually built a career as a Linux System Engineer, Jean-Roch Rossi started Linux administration as a hobby and a help-desk job in college.

An anonymous reader writes: The VFX industry has for most of the last 30 years been reliant on Macs and Windows machines for video editing, primarily because all of the Linux-based FOSS tools have been less than great. This is a shame, because all of the best 3D and 2D tools, other than video, are entrenched in the Linux environment and perform best there. The lack of decent video editing tools on Linux prevents every VFX studio from becoming a Linux-only shop. That being said, there are some strides being made to bridge this gap. What setup do you use? What's still missing?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Scopes are the cornerstone of the Ubuntu Phone experience. Its secret weapon in fighting against the app gap that afflicts every new platform, regardless of brand.

The post Awesome Stuff: Ubuntu Phone Aggregator Scopes first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Inexpensive devices like Chromecast can turn any HDMI-enabled TV into a smart TV with immense possibilities to expand its features. And Google continues to add new features to Chromecast, except for one much-needed feature: native support for playback of local content. 

Bunnie Huang's Novena laptop re-invents the laptop with open source (and Free software) in mind, but the hackability that it's built for requires a fair amount of tolerance on a user's part for funky design and visible guts. New submitter dopeghost writes with word of the nearly-funded (via Crowd Supply) Librem laptop, a different kind of Free-software machine using components "specifically selected so that no binary blobs are needed in the Linux kernel that ships with the laptop." Made from high quality components and featuring a MacBook-like design including a choice of HiDPI screen, the Librem might just be the first laptop to ship with a modern Intel CPU that is not locked down to require proprietary firmware. Richard M. Stallman, president of the FSF, said, "Getting rid of the signature checking is an important step. While it doesn't give us free code for the firmware, it means that users will really have control of the firmware once we get free code for it." Unlike some crowdfunding projects, this one is far from pie-in-the-sky, relying mostly on off-the-shelf components, with a planned shipping date in Spring of this year: "Purism is manufacturing the motherboard, and screen printing the keyboard. Purism is sourcing the case, daughter cards, memory, drives, battery, camera, and screen."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








In the past year, we’ve witnessed open source cloud technologies advance in maturity and take off in whole new, unexpected directions. Just consider the many OpenStack distributions, open source networking and container-related projects that didn’t even exist a year ago.

The Internet of Things promises to immerse us in a world of intelligent everyday objects, from tweeting table lamps to weight-watching kettles.

The post Canonical Brings Ubuntu to the Internet of Things first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Robots and such will dance to our tune, hopes Shuttleworth

Getting Ubuntu onto everything from your home router to commercial drones is the next target of Canonical chief Mark Shuttleworth.