Collection of Linux related news hopefully!

Canonical pulls plug on online file locker, can't compete with rivals' free 50GB space

Linux distro biz Canonical is shutting down its Ubuntu One online file and music storage service.

A week ago I flew out to Napa,CA for two days of discussions with various kernel people (ok, and some postgresql people too) about all things VM and FS/IO related. I learned a lot. These short focussed conferences have way more value to me these days personally than the conferences of years ago with a bunch of tracks, and day after day of presentations.

Last week, I attended the Linux Storage, Filesystems, and Memory Management summit (LSF/MM) on Monday and Tuesday, and the Linux Collaboration Summit (aka Collab) from Wednesday through Friday.  Both events were held at the Meritage Resort in Napa, CA.  This was by invitation of some Linux developers who wanted to find out more about what PostgreSQL needs from the Linux kernel.  Andres Freund and I attended on behalf of the PostgreSQL community; Josh Berkus was present for part of the time as well.
Recognizing that it can't keep up with the Dropboxes of the cloud storage world, Canonical elects to shut down its Ubuntu One file service.

Linux and open source software have demonstrated that collaborative development is a successful model for rapid innovation in the tech sector. Now that model is being applied in other industries from health care, to city government, to education.

The Ubuntu One cloud storage and music store are being axed, Canonical has announced.

The post Ubuntu One File & Music Services Axed, Here’s All You Need to Know first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

'Seriously, this is just wasting electricity' huffs securo boffin

Miscreants are using hacked digital video recorders in a somewhat misguided attempt to mine cryptocurrency BitCoins.

What's that sound? Why, it's another Humble Bundle! Humble Bundle: PC and Android 9 is here with six titles for Linux gamers.

The post Humble Bundle: PC and Android 9 Starts With 6 Games for Linux first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

The next generation of KDE libraries, Frameworks 5, has reached its first beta.

The post First Beta of KDE Frameworks 5 Released first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Every detail matters, and building great software means taking time to remove the papercuts. Ubuntu has over the past 5 years been refined in many ways to feel amazingly comfortable on the cloud. In the very early days of EC2 growth the Ubuntu team recognised how many developers were enjoying fast access to infrastructure on demand, and we set about polishing up Ubuntu to be amazing on the cloud.

This was a big program of work; the Linux experience had many bad assumptions baked in – everything had been designed to be installed once on a server then left largely untouched for as long as possible, but cloud infrastructure was much more dynamic than that.

We encouraged our team to use the cloud as much as possible, which made the work practical and motivated people to get it right themselves. If you want to catch all the little scratchy bits, make it part of your everyday workflow. Today, we have added OpenStack clouds to the mix, as well as the major public clouds. Cloud vendors have taken diverse approaches to IAAS so we find ourselves encouraging developers to use all of them to get a holistic view, and also to address any cloud-specific issues that arise. But the key point is – if it’s great for us, that’s a good start on making it great for everybody.

Then we set about interviewing cloud users and engaging people who were deep into cloud infrastructure to advise on what they needed. We spent a lot of time immersing ourselves in the IAAS experience through the eyes of cloud users – startups and industrial titans, universities and mid-sized, everyday companies. We engaged the largest and fastest-moving cloud users like Netflix, who have said they enjoy Ubuntu as a platform on the cloud. And that in turn drove our prioritisation of paper-cuts and significant new features for cloud users.

We also looked at the places people actually spend time developing. Lots of them are on Ubuntu desktops, but Windows and MacOS are popular too, and it takes some care to make it very easy for folks there to have a great devops experience.

All of this is an industrial version of the user experience design process that also powers our work on desktop, tablet and phone – system interfaces and applications. Devops, sysadmins, developers and their managers are humans too, so human-centric design principles are just as important on the infrastructure as they are on consumer electronics and consumer software. Feeling great at the command line, being productive as an operator and a developer, are vital to our community and our ecosystem. We keep all the potency of Linux with the polish of a refined, designed environment.

Along the way we invented and designed a whole raft of key new pieces of Ubuntu. I’ll write about one of them, cloud-init, next. The net effect of that work makes Ubuntu really useful on every cloud. That’s why the majority of developers using IAAS do so on Ubuntu.