Collection of Linux related news hopefully!

MaDLeeTs create 5-minute nuisance for Montenegro domain registrar

Hackers have defaced more than 3,000 .me websites in a web graffiti attack carried out on Sunday.

Now that linux.conf.au is over, there has been a bunch of information running around about the status of kdbus and the integration of it with systemd. So, here’s a short summary of what’s going on at the moment. Lennart Poettering gave a talk about kdbus at linux.conf.au. The talk can be viewed here, and the slides are here. Go read the slides and watch the talk, odds are, most of your questions will be answered there already. For those who don’t want to take the time watching the talk, lwn.net wrote up a great summary of the talk, and that article is here. For those of you without a lwn.net subscription, what are you waiting for? You’ll have to wait two weeks before it comes out from behind the paid section of the website before reading it, sorry. There will be a systemd hack-fest a few days before FOSDEM, where we should hopefully pound out the remaining rough edges on the codebase and get it ready to be merged. Lennart will also be giving his kdbus talk again at FOSDEM if anyone wants to see it in person. The kdbus code can be found in two places, both on google code, and on github, depending on where you like to browse things. In a few weeks we’ll probably be creating some patches and submitting it for inclusion in the main kernel, but more testing with the latest systemd code needs to be done first. If you want more information about the kdbus interface, and how it works, please see the kdbus.txt file for details. Binder vs. kdbus A lot of people have asked about replacing Android’s binder code with kdbus. I originally thought this could be done, but as time has gone by, I’ve come to the conclusion that this will not happen with the first version of kdbus, and possibly can never happen. First off, go read that link describing binder that I pointed to above, especially all of the links to different resources from that page. That should give you more than you ever wanted to know about binder. Short answer Binder is bound to the CPU, D-Bus (and hence kdbus), is bound to RAM. Long answer Binder Binder is an interface that Android uses to provide synchronous calling (CPU) from one task to a thread of another task. There is no queueing involved in these calls, other than the caller process is suspended until...

Support for popular content bookmarking service Pocket has been added to GNOME Online Accounts, allowing for some nifty desktop integration.

The post ‘Pocket’ Support Added to GNOME Online Accounts first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

'Long road' ahead before they'll be sold in carriers' stores

Commercial smartphones running the mobile version of the Ubuntu Linux distro probably won't be available through carriers until 2015 at the earliest, a Canonical spokesman has revealed.

Steve Wexler raised an interesting question last week: Is SDN revolutionary or evolutionary? His post touches on a reality that's been bothering me for years. 

Creating appropriate menus for your app is vital to creating a good user experience. In the last tutorial, we looked at creating the options menu with XML and also at adding items programmatically. In this tutorial, we'll look at contextual menus — menus which relate to a particular part of the view.

Researchers at the National Cancer Institutes's Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology are building an open source public cloud to broaden access to cancer genomics data, and speed experimentation and discovery.

Managing virtual machines and hypervisors can be a real pain. Managing multiple ones across multiple platforms is even worse Convirture is easing the headaches.

GNOME has finally gotten around to updating the look and feel of their text editor, 'Gedit'.

The post Gedit Text Editor Finally Gets a UI Revamp first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

First of many brandgasm 'waves' to come

Cloud computing has wrecked the carefully tended brands of tech infrastructure providers by smothering their dodgy logos in layers and layers of opaque software, and Intel is not content to let all that expensive marketing go to waste.