Collection of Linux related news hopefully!

If you are hoping to lay down some hard earned cash for a Linux-based Steam Machine sometime this year, you ought to look away now.

The post Controller Changes May See Steam Machines Delayed Until 2015 first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Sysadmin blog The essential toolkit

In response to a previous article, a number of readers have submitted their views on essential systems administration tools. A few responses stand out from the rest.

App wipes memory, encrypts hysterical hacker boxes

The next time the police kick down a hackers' door, suspects can reach for the Panic button to make it nigh-on impossible for plod to recover any data, even if they freeze their target PCs.

Nearly all Linux desktops depend upon a very user-friendly printer configure/management tool called system-config-printer. Though there may be minor differences in the GUI (from distribution to distribution), the use of the tool is the same – and it's incredibly easy.

Now in its tenth release, the latest Humble Bundle for PC and Android is now live and features a selection of games brand new to Linux.

The post Humble Bundle 10 for PC and Android Arrives With New Linux Games In Tow first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Updated There's now just one store and Netscape plugins aren't invited

Google is tightening security on its Chrome web browser by making it harder to install plugins and extensions that could contain malicious code.

M-Saunders (706738) writes "It might sound daunting, but kernel hacking isn't a mysterious black art reserved for the geekiest of programmers. With a bit of background knowledge, anyone with a grounding in C can implement a new kernel module and understand how the kernel works internally. Linux Voice explains how to write a module that creates a new device node, /dev/reverse, that reverses a string when it's written to it. Sure, it's not the most practical example in the world, but it's a good starting point for your own projects, and gives you an insight into how it all fits together."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Many will think of the Raspberry Pi or BeagleBone Black when considering a DIY project running Linux. But if you want to do some CPU-heavy work in your DIY project, like running some opencv code to give your project some vision, the Radxa might be the right choice. Even if you're not looking at a DIY project, this machine makes for a nice little Linux server.  

Bismillah (993337) writes "Once again, after the Red Flag Linux effort that petered out this year, China is considering Linux to sort out its pressing Windows XP issue. The Windows 8 ban by China's government procurement agency and promises of official support may help."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








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