Collection of Linux related news hopefully!

Canonical has patched a significant security flaw in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS — one that potentially allowed attackers to gain access to a user account without needing to enter a password.

The post Ubuntu Fixes Security Flaw in 14.04 LTS Lock Screen first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Red Hat clutches Gluster in one arm, beckons Ceph with wad of cash

Open-source slinger Red Hat has bulked up its cloud storage arsenal by buying Inktank, the main developer of Ceph for about $175m in cash.

When electrical engineer Manjinder Bains learned in January that his employer's planned restructuring would put his job at risk, he signed up to take a training course that teaches how the Linux kernel is built, and the tools used for debugging and monitoring the kernel.

An anonymous reader writes "Red Hat announced their pending acquisition of Inktank this morning. Sage Weil and a team of researchers at University of California Santa Cruz first published the architecture in 2007. Sage joined DreamHost after college and continued development on Ceph until DreamHost spun off a Inktank, a company focused solely on Ceph. In Sage's blog post on the acquisition, he says 'In particular, joining forces with the Red Hat team will improve our ability to address problems at all layers of the storage stack, including in the kernel.' Sage goes on to announce that Inktank's proprietary management tools for Ceph will now be open sourced, citing Red Hat's pure open source development and business models. Ceph has seen wide adoption in OpenStack customer deployments, alongside Red Hat's existing Gluster system." Ceph looks pretty cool if you're doing serious storage: CERN has a 3 Petabyte "prototype" cluster in use now (Only tangentially related, but still interesting, is how CERN does storage in general).

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Grab a pencil and the nearest piece of paper: the expected release date of Ubuntu 14.10 'Utopic Unicorn' is October 16, 2014.

The post Ubuntu 14.10 Release Schedule first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

Review Keeping data safe

Druva seems to be on a quest right now to get its name seen by as many people as possible; lately I have been bombarded by more inSync banner ads than I can shake a stick at. So it came as no surprise when the Reg asked me to have a look at what the backup and management biz does – and whether it is any good at it.

Second update covers the former Sun system with cloudy goodness

Former Unix server customers are continuing the march toward Linux and for many there's no looking back, but that hasn't stopped Oracle from continuing development of Solaris Unix – albeit slowly.

Earlier this month the dream of a fully open source laptop took one step closer to becoming a reality with the launch of the Novena crowd-funding campaign. In the Myriad-RF project we'd been keenly following Novena developments for some time, and the campaign is all it took to convince us that we should adapt one of our software defined radio transceiver designs to enable use with the platform.

Point and click fingering is the future, claims team

A team of engineers formerly from Google and Jawbone thinks it has cracked gesture recognition for electronics with a Bluetooth-equipped ring that can control cursor movements and manipulate household devices.

An anonymous reader writes "Researchers at the Kaspersky Lab have uncovered a zero-day Adobe Flash vulnerability that affects Windows, OS X, and Linux. 'While the exploit Kaspersky observed attacked only computers running Microsoft Windows, the underlying flaw, which is formally categorized as CVE-2014-1776 and resides in a Flash component known as the Pixel Bender, is present in the Adobe application built for OS X and Linux machines as well.' Adobe has reportedly patched the bug for all platforms. Researchers first detected the bug from attacks performed on seven Syrian computers. The attacks seem to have been hosted on the Syrian Ministry of Justice website, which has led to speculation that these are state-sponsored vulnerability exploits. This speculation is further supported by evidence that one of the exploits was 'designed to target computers that have the Cisco Systems MeetingPlace Express Add-In version 5x0 installed. The app is used to view documents and images during Web conferences.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.