Collection of Linux related news hopefully!

Grab 'near-final' version of next Enterprise Linux next week

Red Hat has announced that a release candidate (RC) of the next version of its flagship enterprise Linux OS has already been distributed to its strategic partners and will be made available to the general public next week.

Big Red's cloud is safe and Oracle Linux 6 has been patched, but Java has some issues

Oracle has emitted its formal advice about Heartbleed, revealing it has 13 products that need a patch and 14 more “which may be vulnerable”.

Admins dab straining server brows in advance of Trusty Tahr's long-term support landing

Canonical has announced that the latest long-term support release of its Ubuntu Linux distribution will be available in two days.

FrankenContainer scheme blends tiny OS with Docker containers

Red Hat has put its Linux operating system on a diet to create a scrappy technology that will take on traditional virtualization approaches such as those backed by VMware, Microsoft, and Citrix.

If you want to contribute to the Linux kernel but aren't sure where to start, the Eudyptula Challenge could be a great way to test your programming skills and learn how to participate in the kernel community.

But where's the final release of Red Hat's flagship Linux server distribution?
Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes: "When Edward Snowden first emailed Glenn Greenwald, he insisted on using email encryption software called PGP for all communications. Now Klint Finley reports that Snowden also used The Amnesic Incognito Live System (Tails) to keep his communications out of the NSA's prying eyes. Tails is a kind of computer-in-a-box using a version of the Linux operating system optimized for anonymity that you install on a DVD or USB drive, boot your computer from and you're pretty close to anonymous on the internet. 'Snowden, Greenwald and their collaborator, documentary film maker Laura Poitras, used it because, by design, Tails doesn't store any data locally,' writes Finley. 'This makes it virtually immune to malicious software, and prevents someone from performing effective forensics on the computer after the fact. That protects both the journalists, and often more importantly, their sources.' The developers of Tails are, appropriately, anonymous. They're protecting their identities, in part, to help protect the code from government interference. 'The NSA has been pressuring free software projects and developers in various ways,' the group says. But since we don't know who wrote Tails, how do we know it isn't some government plot designed to snare activists or criminals? A couple of ways, actually. One of the Snowden leaks show the NSA complaining about Tails in a Power Point Slide; if it's bad for the NSA, it's safe to say it's good for privacy. And all of the Tails code is open source, so it can be inspected by anyone worried about foul play. 'With Tails,' say the distro developers, 'we provide a tongue and a pen protected by state-of-the-art cryptography to guarantee basic human rights and allow journalists worldwide to work and communicate freely and without fear of reprisal.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








I'd highly recommend taking the introductory course to anyone, hobbyist or professional, who wants to quickly gain a more technical understanding of Linux and become more adept at using the command line. And with the Linux Foundation's recently announced partnership with edX, everyone has free access to the course and training materials through the MOOC. There's no excuse not to try it!

Linux Foundation Executive Director Jim Zemlin and edX CEO and MIT professor Anant Agarwal answered questions in a live Twitter chat yesterday about the free Intro to Linux training course that will be available on the edX online learning platform starting around Aug. 1. Here are some of the highlights of the chat in question and answer format.

Canonical has begun sending e-mails to users of the Ubuntu One file service informing them of the impending shut down.

The post Canonical Begins E-Mailing Ubuntu One Users To Warn of Shutdown first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.